Shackelford: How Tiger Woods plans to hit his numbers at the PGA Championship


 

Tiger Woods was in good spirits to kick off his return to Bethpage Black and the 2019 PGA Championship, touching on an array of topics from Olympic golf (nice if it happens) to the state of his game and the Black Course. Steve DiMeglio with the full round-up here for Golfweek.

Two quotes stood out in his comments.

Q. You haven’t gone major to major without playing all that often in your career, but as you look ahead now, is it something you might consider doing more often? And just sort of how do you weigh the need for reps versus the need for rest at this point?

You know, that’s a great question because the only other time where I’ve taken four weeks off prior to major championships is going from the British Open to the PGA. Usually that was my summer break, and take those four weeks off and then get ready for the PGA, Firestone and the fall. So I’m always looking for breaks. Generally it’s after the Masters I used to take four weeks off there. Now, with the condensed schedule, it’s trying to find breaks.

You know, I wanted to play at Quail Hollow, but to be honest with you, I wasn’t ready yet to start the grind of practicing and preparing and logging all those hours again. I was lifting — my numbers were good. I was feeling good in the gym, but I wasn’t mentally prepared to log in the hours.

Ok first we had players wanting to his certain Trackman numbers. Now gym numbers?

Coming here is a different story. I was able to log in the hours, put in the time and feel rested and ready. That’s going to be the interesting part going forward; how much do I play and how much do I rest. I think I’ve done a lot of the legwork and the hard work already, trying to find my game over the past year and a half. Now I think it’s just maintaining it. I know that I feel better when I’m fresh. The body doesn’t respond like it used to, doesn’t bounce back quite as well, so I’ve got to be aware of that.

And this seemed to be a nice statement for those leading the game who insist there is nothing wrong with five hour rounds, or slow play in general.

Q. Tiger, more minorities and young women are taking up the sport than before because of all of the initiatives in place, but that isn’t reflected in the college participation numbers. Asians are the only minorities that are showing an increase. What do you think is happening? Why aren’t the kids who are taking up the game sticking with it?

You know, that’s the question for all of us that’s been a difficult one to figure out, to put our finger on. The First Tee has done an amazing job of creating facilities and creating atmospheres for kids to be introduced to the game, but also have some type of sustainability within the game.

But it’s difficult. There are so many different things that are pulling at kids to go different directions. Golf is just merely one of the vehicles.

Now, with today’s — as I said, there’s so many different things that kids can get into and go towards that honestly playing five hours, five and a half hours of a sport just doesn’t sound too appealing. That’s one of the things that we’ve tried to increase is the pace of play and try and make sure that’s faster, because most of us in this room, if you’ve gone probably five minutes without checking your phone, you’re jonesing. Kids are the same way; five hours on a golf course seems pretty boring.

Five hours? If only.

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